Artfully Adding AV to Attractions

 Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History  opens new gallery with a Planetarium Dome

Commercial Integrator Magazine features Mad Systems and the 14-foot negative-pressure projection dome recently installed at the Corpus Christi Museum of Science & History in Texas!

“Integrators are looking to use AV systems in unique ways, as museum clients look to stand out in a crowded market,” explains Dan Daley in the Commercial Integrator article, Artfully Adding AV to Attractions.

The solution: inserting a negative-pressure dome that acts as an inviting isolation chamber and unique projection surface.

“We’ve been using these systems for museum exhibits because you can achieve a planetarium effect in a small space, or a video-game environment, like a flight simulator, at a relatively low cost,” says Maris Ensing, Mad Systems Lead Engineer.

The domes, which range drastically in size from 10 feet to 115 feet in diameter, work very successfully for permanent exhibits but are increasingly being used for semi-permanent installations.

VISIT THE MUSEUM

The Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History is now open. Explore the dome exhibit, Run with Dinosaurs, and learn about chemical reactions, all while having fun in the name of science!

Full Article: Commercial Integrator Magazine, March 2016
Artfully Adding AV to Attractions | by Dan Daley

Domes Home to Video Innovation

Integrators are looking to use AV systems in unique ways, as museum clients look to stand out in a crowded market. For instance, a dash of retro is evidenced in installations that are using variations on Buckminster Fuller’s dome shapes from the mid last century as projection surfaces.

Intended for the Corpus Christi Museum of Science & History but initially set up in the warehouse of Mad Systems in Orange County, Calif., a 14-foot negative-pressure dome acts as an inviting isolation chamber for an intimate planetarium-type exhibit. Used increasingly for semi-permanent situations, negative-pressure inflated domes utilize a fan to extract air from between the external structural envelope of the dome and the inner fabric envelope, creating negative pressure that causes the envelope to conform perfectly to the shape of the dome and act as a projection screen.

Mad Systems is using Full Dome’s products for this, a brand they rep on the West Coast. “We’ve been using these systems for museum exhibits because you can achieve a planetarium effect in a small space, or a video-game environment, like a flight simulator, at a relatively low cost,” says Maris Ensing of Mad Systems, who adds it’s becoming popular for corporate presentations and product launches at events. “You don’t have to commit architecturally to an exhibit installation, though they can be permanent if you want them to be. They’re excellent for putting multiple small projectors into and then blending images.” In the Corpus Christi installation, which is intended to be permanent, Mad Systems has installed three small projectors that hang off the rim of the dome’s exoskeleton. “This way you don’t need a truss, and instead of the traditional planetarium approach of using a large projector with a mirror (ed: or in the center of the space), you can use several smaller, edge-blended projectors on the perimeter and get complete coverage without taking up any floor space.”

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